Tag Archives: Prickly wild rose

Project 366 – Post No. 102 – Water droplets on a Wild Rose

What is Project 366? Read more here!

If your look around the forest after a rain, you might notice that some leaves shed the water readily and appear dry while on other leaves the water pools in droplets. Leaves are covered in a waxy cuticle and the structure and chemistry of the cuticle determines how water on its surface behaves. The stronger the water is repelled from the surface of the leave the larger and more dome shaped the water droplets on the leaves are. It is the cohesive intermolecular forces between the water molecules (specifically the hydrogen bonds between water molecules) that result in surface tension That ultimately form the spherical shape. There is probably a lot more that could be said about this phenomenon but suffice to say that is quite photogenic.

Water droplets on a Prickly Wild Rose (Rosa acicularis) at the MacTaggard Sanctuary, Edmonton. July 7, 2019. Nikon P1000, 134mm @ 35mm, 1/200s, f/4, ISO 100

May the curiosity be with you. This is from “The Birds are Calling” blog (www.thebirdsarecalling.com). Copyright Mario Pineda.

Project 366 – Post No. 090 – Prickly Wild Rose

What is Project 366? Read more here!

The Prickly Wild Rose (Rosa acicularis), also known as Alberta Wild Rose, Wild Rose and Nootka Rose is a small deciduous shrub with pink flowers and thick, thorny stems. Once the flowers wither it turns into a small oval shaped seed pod known as a rose hip. It has a circumpolar distribution occurring on both sides of the Pacific and Atlantic oceans and is the official flower of the province of Alberta. Rose hip soup is a bit of a staple food stuff in Sweden. In this part of the world you would be lucky if you found rose hip tea. There is however a little know but reliable supplier of a “Rosehip drink” in these neck of the woods. At IKEA they stock rosehip drink, which is probably as close as you get to bonafide Swedish rosehip soup. Why does this matter in the big scheme of things? Firstly because rose hip soup is super yummy and secondly, every time I encounter a Wild Rose bush it reminds me of Sweden, where I spend a few decades many moons ago drinking rose hip soup out of the thermos during the winter (beats hot coco hands down).

Prickly wild rose (Rosa acicularis) at Elk Island National Park. June 16, 2019. Nikon P1000, 146mm @ 35mm, 1/500s, f/4, ISO 100

May the curiosity be with you. This is from “The Birds are Calling” blog (www.thebirdsarecalling.com). Copyright Mario Pineda.