Tag Archives: Hawrelak Park

Project 366 – Post No. 163 – Blue spruce

What is Project 366? Read more here!

The Blue Spruce (Picea pungens) can be found natively through the Rocky Mountains with Alberta being its northern limit. These evergreen shrub with their blue-green needles and perfect conical shape have a regal looking about them. In traditional First Nations medicine the needles are used for an infusion to treat colds and an upset stomach. These are slow growing trees that with as lifespan of hundreds of years. The squirrels in the river valley have a particular fondness for the cones of the Blue Spruce. It’s not uncommon to see squirrels with in full speed with carrying spruce cones to their middens where they store them for the winter.

Blue Spruce (Picea pungens) in Hawrelak park. August 31, 2019. Nikon P1000, 24mm @ 35mm, 1/60, f/2.8, ISO 100

May the curiosity be with you. This is from “The Birds are Calling” blog (www.thebirdsarecalling.com). Copyright Mario Pineda.

Project 366 – Post No. 159 – Goldeneye in the rain

What is Project 366? Read more here!

It started raining as soon as I arrived at Hawrelak park. I sat in the car for a few minutes debating if I should call off my nature walk or if I should brave the rain and proceed with my planed walk. In end end I decided to go for the walk. Is was not raining too hard and I had brought my camera’s rain gear so I should be good. Perhaps not surprising most birds had taken refuge from the rain and were nowhere to be seen, but – perhaps unsurprising – the waterfowl were out. An assortment of waterfowl were hanging out on the pond, seemingly oblivious to the rain. There were quite a few what looked like immature Common Goldeneye hanging chugging around, diving and popping up all over the place. I am not 100% sure about the identification as these fellas were all brown with black bills and eyes. Common Goldneyes seem to be the best match.

Common Goldeneye (Bucephala clangula ) in a rainy Hawrelak park. August 31, 2019. Nikon P1000, 935mm @ 35mm, 1/160, f/5.6, ISO 400

May the curiosity be with you. This is from “The Birds are Calling” blog (www.thebirdsarecalling.com). Copyright Mario Pineda.

Project 366 – Post No. 158 – American Coot

What is Project 366? Read more here!

It’s not often you see a coot on dry land and this fella appears oddly disproportionate as it is standing at the waters edge at the Hawrelak park pond. Coots look quite craceful when chugging through the water this one is more plump-looking, chicken-like with a too small head, or too chunky body. It was a balmy end-of-the-summer day and the coot and its nearby chicks looked quite comfortable just hanging out on the well-manicured lawn. Coots do migrate a south in the winter, but tend not to go far south. It seems that they are just flying far enough to avoid the coldest of the deep freeze. The coot may be an accomplished swimmer and diver, but it is an awkward and clumsy flier often requiring long running takeoffs across the waster surface. It sort of makes sense that it would keep its winter migration short.

American Coot (Fulica americana) in Hawrelak park. August 31, 2019. Nikon P1000, 1109mm @ 35mm, 1/125s, f/5.6, ISO 400

May the curiosity be with you. This is from “The Birds are Calling” blog (www.thebirdsarecalling.com). Copyright Mario Pineda.

Project 366 – Post No. 157 – Outfall 24

What is Project 366? Read more here!

On the banks of the North Saskatchewan River there are a large number of outfalls. An outfall is a drainage facility that conveys stormwater into a natural receiving water body (ex. creek, river, etc…). There city has a map online of all the outfall locations and, well, there are quite a few of them. The other day, as I was walking along the southern shore of the North Saskatchewan River I spotted Outfall 23 across the river. I noticed that the water coming out of the culvert was foaming and getting stuck along the shore as it drifted down stream. Foamy water in itself does not necessarily mean that the water is contaminated (see my previous post number 131 on foam lines). This time, however, it was clear that the foam originated from the outfall culvert. Outfalls convey stormwater that has been collect from runoff from impervious surfaces (e.g., roofs and roads) typically from entire neighbourhoods. This means that pollutants from roadways, lawns and roofs are essentially concentrated and discharged at a single point making the outfall a point source for pollution. The water quality in the North Saskatchewan River changes throughout the seasons with high runoff seasons such as spring resulting in more silty and polluted water. A 1994 study found that discharge of stormwater during summer rain storms does affect water quality in the North Saskatchewan River, including increasing levels of heavy metals and fecal coliform bacteria. The same study also found that the composition of invertebrate animals are dramatically affected downstream from Edmonton due to the change in water chemistry as it flows through the city. One of the effects is an increase in the nutrient levels in the river (think lawn fertilizers) which on one hand can augment the food base for the invertebrates but it can also wreck havoc with the levels of disolved oxygen, similarly to lake suffering from eutrophication (nutrient enrichment).

Stormwater outfall 24 along the North Saskatchewan River. August 31, 2019. Nikon P1000, 78mm @ 35mm, 1/60s, f/3.5, ISO 110

May the curiosity be with you. This is from “The Birds are Calling” blog (www.thebirdsarecalling.com). Copyright Mario Pineda.

Project 366 – Post No. 156 – Creeping Thistle metamorphosis

What is Project 366? Read more here!

The Creeping Thistle inflorescences, which are everywhere along forest edges and open fields, are slowly undergoing a metamorphosis from pretty fuzzy purple flowers to mangy-looking fuzzy grey bunches of seed. The seeds have a feathery appendage, aka as a pappus, that enable the seed to be carried by the wind. Wind dispersed seeds is, however, only one trick the Creeping Thistle has up its sleeve when it comes to reproducing. It is also able to make new copies of itself by reproducing vegetatively by developing an extensive lateral root system.

Creeping Thistle (Cirsium arvense). August 31, 2019. Nikon P1000, 78mm @ 35mm, 1/60s, f/3.5, ISO 110

May the curiosity be with you. This is from “The Birds are Calling” blog (www.thebirdsarecalling.com). Copyright Mario Pineda.

Project 366 – Post No. 155 – Juvenile Ring-billed Gull

What is Project 366? Read more here!

It had been raining all night and all day and it did not look like the rain was about to stop any time soon. So I wrapped up my camera in it’s rain gear, donned a rain jacket and rubber boots and headed to Hawrelak park. There were not many birds around other than the usual suspects in an around the pond. On the well-manicured lawn right by the pond an immature Ring-billed Gull was relaxing. It did not seem bothered by my presence. Although gulls are common they can be notoriously difficult to identify and entire books have been dedicated to telling one gull species from another. Their plumage change as they age and there is a great deal of variation within species and often little variation between species. Hawrelak park usually has a large contingent of Ring-billed Gulls, so it is likely that any gull found in the park is one of those… except that this individual does not look like a typical Ring-billed Gull. Although the bill has black on it, the black ring on the bill is noticeably absent and the rest if the plumage is completely different from a Ring-billed Gull. It turns out that this individual’s plumage and bill is the look that juvenile Ring-billed Gulls sport. The typical look of a Ring-billed Gull is known as the breeding plumage and it takes the gull three years to reach it, with its appearance changing with each fall moult.

Juvenile Ring-billed Gull (Laurus delawarensis). August 31, 2019. Nikon P1000, 1008mm @ 35mm, 1/500s, f/5.6, ISO 320

May the curiosity be with you. This is from “The Birds are Calling” blog (www.thebirdsarecalling.com). Copyright Mario Pineda.

Project 366 – Post No. 112 – Common Goldeneye

What is Project 366? Read more here!

Common Goldeneyes have a distance appearance as adults. Females having a chocolate brown head, yellow eyes and males have a distinct white cheek patch. When I spotted this fella chugging through the pond in Hawrelak park my initial hunch was that its overall shape reminded me of a Common Goldeneye, yet none of the other physical characteristics were there (no yellow eye, no check patch). Upon closer research this is likely an immature Common Goldeneye. Common Goldeneyes are diving ducks and this fella certainly lived up to that reputation as it was energetically diving, popping up for a few seconds and then disappearing under water again. If you look closely you can see his head covered in water droplets and sporting a fuzzy wet do.

Immature Common Goldeneye (Bucephala clangula) at Hawrelak Park, Edmonton. July 14, 2019. Nikon P1000, 1008mm @ 35mm, 1/500s, f/5.6, ISO 180

May the curiosity be with you. This is from “The Birds are Calling” blog (www.thebirdsarecalling.com). Copyright Mario Pineda.