Tag Archives: Great Horned Owl

Project 366 – Post No. 352 – Nobody home?

What is Project 366? Read more here.

Last weekend we went by the Great Horned Owl nesting site in the Whitemud Ravine. Since the beginning of March the female has been in her cavity every day with the male perching high up in a nearby pine tree. This time, however, there was not sight of the female in the cavity. It is unlikely that the female would leave her tree, particularly during the day. A quick scan of the nearby trees revealed that the male was sitting in the same spot where I saw him the previous week. It is even more unlikely that the male would be there if the female would have left the nest. I concluded that the female indeed must have been in the nest, but quite likely was hunkered down inside the cavity making it impossible to see her from the outside. Based on our experience from last year nesting it appears that the cavity is quite deep as it was able to accommodate the large female and two sizable chicks.

May the curiosity be with you. This is from “The Birds are Calling” blog (www.thebirdsarecalling.com). Copyright Mario Pineda.

Project 366 – Post No. 344 – Owl in blizzard

What is Project 366? Read more here.

Yesterday’s post features a carefree Red Squirrel in a snow blizzard. Today’s post is featuring the Whitemud Ravine Great Horned mom owl in her tree cavity sitting out the blizzard. Getting this picture proved to be a bit of a challenge as the camera’s focusing system was being thrown off by the falling snow. We visited mom and pops owl last week, and this weekend they are still there. Mom still in her cavity and pops on guard in a nearby tree. I am not sure if the female is sitting on the eggs yet. If not it would just be a matter if time.

May the curiosity be with you. This is from “The Birds are Calling” blog (www.thebirdsarecalling.com). Copyright Mario Pineda.

Project 366 – Post No. 342 – Birding in a snow storm

What is Project 366? Read more here.

It can be safely said that most people would agree that a snow blizzard is not the best circumstances for going birding. But if the birding is on the agenda and it just happens to snow…, sometimes you just have to bite the bullet and go for it. Birding while the snow flying sideways presents particular challenges. Some are obvious such as such as snow covered binoculars and the need to protect camera equipment. Other are perhaps not obvious, such as the camera focusing system being thrown off by blowing snow. Oh, and the minor detail that most birds are in hiding during such inclement weather is also somewhat of an inconvenience. This particular birding outing had, however, a particular goal in mind…, to check in on mom and pops Great Horned Owls, which, are pretty much stationary and this point no matter the weather conditions.

May the curiosity be with you. This is from “The Birds are Calling” blog (www.thebirdsarecalling.com). Copyright Mario Pineda.

Project 366 – Post No. 336 – Mom and pops Great Horned Owls are back

What is Project 366? Read more here.

March 1 and mom and pops Great Horned owl team is back in their cavernous tree down in the Whitemud Ravine. This couple are a bit of celebrities and people flock to their tree to watch them snooze. Last year they raised a pair of fluffy chicks using the same nesting location. I wrote several posts about the event: here, here, here and here. Assuming there female is sitting on eggs (or will be shortly) based on last year’s time line we are probably not going to see any owlets until end of April or beginning of May at least. So we are in for a bit of a waiting game.

May the curiosity be with you. This is from “The Birds are Calling” blog (www.thebirdsarecalling.com). Copyright Mario Pineda.

Project 366 – Post No. 308 – Superb Owl

What is Project 366? Read more here.

Today seems to be an appropriate day for reminiscing about some of the superb owls I have had the fortune to see over the last year. Although owls are common around here they are remarkable elusive and stealthy. Every time I am walking through the forest I cannot but wonder how many owls I pass by without noticing them. This is of course a rhetorical question that I do not want to know the answer to.

Great Horned Owl basking in the sunlight on a cold winter’s morning.
Great Horned owlets checking out their neighborhood.
Great Horn owl mother in her lair.
Ricky the Saw-whet Owl hard at work educating future generation of birders.
Splendid Snowy Owl just doing what it does best, looking majestic.

May the curiosity be with you. This is from “The Birds are Calling” blog (www.thebirdsarecalling.com). Copyright Mario Pineda.

Project 366 – Post No. 302 – Great Horned Owl basking in the winter sun

What is Project 366? Read more here.

On this sunny mild winters day we came across one of the Whitemud Ravine Great Horned Owls perching in a tree overlooking the creek. It was soaking up the suns rays and seemed fast asleep. I cannot blame it. After the last few weeks of bitterly cold weather the -10 C day must have felt nice and balmy. According to eBird the last time a Great Horned Owl was observed in the ravine was in October last year. Has the owl been there the whole time, but just not seen? Has it been somewhere else and only recently returned to this location? Is it alone, or does it have a mate? The owl we saw was close to a tree where a pair of Great Horned Owls raised a pair of owlets last spring. Is this one of those owls and is it back for another breading season? So many questions and no answers. I will be keeping a close eye on the owls in the ravine and hopefully we will see another season of successful owlets born and raised in our very own backyard ravine.

May the curiosity be with you. This is from “The Birds are Calling” blog (www.thebirdsarecalling.com). Copyright Mario Pineda.

Project 366 – Post No. 214 – Owls vs beavers

What is Project 366? Read more here!

There is a rather unique tree down in the Whitemud Ravine. It is large and tall and half way up its trunk there is a l large cavity that has been used as a nesting cavity by Great Horned Owls for a number of years, most recently last spring. The other day I noticed that the base of the trunk had been wrapped in wired mesh. With the beavers coming back with a vengeance over the last few weeks it is hardly surprising that the city has tried to protect the tree. The City of Edmonton’s official policy on reducing beaver damage is to protect “high value trees” using metal mesh around the base of the trunk. As this is the only know Great Horned Owl nest it this part of the ravine this is definitely a high-value tree (see post 32). At this time of the year, the owls are nowhere to be see. One can only hope that the will be back next spring with a new batch of adorable owlets.

May the curiosity be with you. This is from “The Birds are Calling” blog (www.thebirdsarecalling.com). Copyright Mario Pineda.

Project 366 – Post No. 056 – Great Horned Owlets

What is Project 366? Read more here!

I had never been down to the Whitemud Ravine in the morning before. Last Tuesday I was off from work and woke up early to a beautiful sunny morning. It was the perfect morning for a nature walk down by the creek. Said and done, at 7 am I started out down at the Snow Valley parking lot. Right off the bat, the birding kicked in at full gear with a bunch of Chipping Sparrows (Spizella passerina) hanging out in the trees by the parking lot. These were lifers for me and by playing their call through the Merlin App I had them sitting all around me in the trees curiously eyeing me. I can just imagine what must have been going though their bird brains, “Is this an intruder?” or “Is this a potential mate?”. That was a great start to a morning of some awesome birding. Other than two lifers, the highlight was definitely the Great Horned Owlets that were hanging out in their cavity. They were about 3 weeks old and getting quite large. By owl standards they would probably be considered teenagers. They sure behaved like teenagers, curious, oblivious to the dangers of the outside world, not following their owl parent instructions etc. There they were, perching precariously at the edge of the nest and ogling passersby. The sudden croaking of ravens directed their attention skywards. I am not sure if they would be aware of the dangers the ravens pose, but their parents definitely are. Dad, sitting in a nearby tree, started hooting and right away mom was inbound. She landed at the edge of the cavity pushing her owlets inside. The owlets had none of it as they tried to get past mom to check out what the commotion was about. Although the mother barely fit in the nest she blocked the entrance pushing her owlets back into the nest as she intently eyed the skies for the ravens. I spend well over an hour at the nest, snapping pictures and shooting videos of the chicks.

Nikon P1000, 1108mm @ 35mm, 1/200s, f/5.6, ISO 400.

Below is a video clip (13:16 min) of the action at the nest. Mom arrives at 7:32 and the person you can hear talking and shooting pictures in the background is Wayne Oaks, the resident Whitemud Ravine birding afictionado.

All in all, it was an amazing and beautiful morning full of birds, two of which were lifers (Chipping Sparrow and the American Goldfinch). I could have continued but after 3.5 hrs and 6 km my stomach started to grumble so it was time for a second breakfast and more coffee. This experience has opened my eyes to the virtues of early morning birding. The weekend cannot arrive soon enough.

Here is the eBird summary of the morning.

Edmonton–Whitemud Park, Edmonton, Alberta, CA
May 21, 2019 7:07 AM – 10:37 AM
Protocol: Traveling
6.341 kilometer(s)
18 species

Canada Goose (Branta canadensis)  5
Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos)  12
Green-winged Teal (Anas crecca)  2
Common Goldeneye (Bucephala clangula)  3
Common Merganser (Mergus merganser)  5
Great Horned Owl (Bubo virginianus)  4
Downy Woodpecker (Dryobates pubescens)  1
Pileated Woodpecker (Dryocopus pileatus)  1     Sound only
Common Raven (Corvus corax)  3
Black-capped Chickadee (Poecile atricapillus)  15
American Robin (Turdus migratorius)  4
House Finch (Haemorhous mexicanus)  1
American Goldfinch (Spinus tristis)  2
Chipping Sparrow (Spizella passerina)  3
Dark-eyed Junco (Junco hyemalis)  3
White-throated Sparrow (Zonotrichia albicollis)  1
Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodia)  2
Common Grackle (Quiscalus quiscula)  1

May the curiosity be with you. This is from “The Birds are Calling” blog (www.thebirdsarecalling.com). Copyright Mario Pineda.

Project 366 – Post No. 047 – Mother’s Day Owl

What is Project 366? Read more here!

The female Great Horned Owl down at the Whitemud Ravine has now been holed up in her tree for 2 months (that’s 60 days folks). There is reliable intelligence (i.e. picture evidence) showing that her eggs now have hatched and that she has at least two adorable fuzzy chicks. I went down to check out the new family on Mother’s Day (last Sunday). It was a beautiful and sunny spring day and lots of people were out on the trails. The trail was busy with adults and kids walking and biking, dogs taking their owners for a walk and the occasional mandatory fitness buffs. I was surprised to find no other birders or photographers were at the nest site. Mom owl was in her nest, with her tail feathers sticking out. Dad owl was nowhere to be seen but the occasional hooting from inside the forest provided reassurance that he was around. I set up my gear and got to try out my new ultra-portable tripod, the JOBY GorillaPod 3K Video PRO with the Nikon P1000. As my mode of transport was my bike I did not want to pack the full sized tripod. The GorrillaPod performed commendable and had no trouble managing the hefty P1000. Of course a lone photographer with a camera pointed skyward attracts attention and it was not long before I had quite a gathering of spectators squinting against the bright sky trying to figure out what I was photographing. Everyone gets super happy and impressed when they are told about the nest with Great Horned Owl mom and her chicks. Owl mom seemed to be sleeping until an overly excited dog came running down the trail, barking and yapping like its life depended on it. Immediately a big yellow eye appeared in the nest scanning the horizon watchfully. She owl did not move a feather but her ever watchful eye was keeping close tabs on our activities below. I did not see the chicks that day, but I spend a long time at the nest taking photos, watching for the dad (which I never spotted, only heard) and talking to people about the owl family. Today’s photo was shoot through the emerging foliage. Your can see a few fuzzy green blobs of leaves bursting out after a long winter.

Nikon P1000, 1000mm @ 35mm, 1/500s, f/5.6, ISO 200. Postprocessed and cropped in Lightroom.

May the curiosity be with you. This is from “The Birds are Calling” blog (www.thebirdsarecalling.com). Copyright Mario Pineda.

Project 366 – Post No. 032 – Great Horned Owl family update

What is Project 366? Read more here!

The secret is out, someone saw one of the Great Horned Owl chicks peaking out of the nest the other day. I am obviously talking about Edmonton’s own celebrity owl family down in the Whitemud Ravine. Last time I was down there, four days ago, mom owl was still in her cavity. I did not see any chicks but mom was peaking out of the nest and she seemed to be “higher up” in the nest, perhaps indicating that there are growing chicks below her. While this is exciting news, I am a bit concerned about the well-being of this celebrity family. Just like any celebrity family, they are under close scrutiny of the public with eager paparazzi nature photographers and birders watching their every move. There always seems to be photographers at the nest. To anyone regularly trafficking the trail it would be completely obvious that there is something interesting hiding in the trees. So far, everyone seems to be mindful and considerate of the feathered family, but it only takes one bad apple to cause irreparable harm. There are good reasons why eBird does not allow the publication of the exact location of owl nests. Owls are vulnerable to disturbances not just from humans but also from other birds. For example, owls are commonly harassed by other birds. If other birds, such as crows, ravens and other raptors, get alerted to the presence of the owls they could start harassing them or even prey on the young. Perhaps one could view all the nature loving photographers and birders as standing on guard around the family, making sure they are not bothered by anyone with ill intentions. I know that I will be back at the nest, carefully and mindfully observing the family from a distance.

Nikon P1000, 1210mm equivalent, 1/200s, f/5.6, ISO 400

May the curiosity be with you. This is from “The Birds are Calling” blog (www.thebirdsarecalling.com). Copyright Mario Pineda.