Project 366 – Post No. 215 – Amiskwaciy Waskahikan

What is Project 366? Read more here!

The traditional name of Edmonton is Amiskwaciy Waskahikan, meaning Beaver Hills House. This place was the traditional meeting ground for many indigenous communities, including the Cree, Saulteaux, Nakota Sioux, Blackfoot and the Métis Peoples. Once one becomes more familiar with the natural history of Edmonton and its surrounding area, the choice of the name Beaver Hills House by the indigenous communities becomes apparent. Beaver houses, or lodges, are never far away. Every lake and pond outside of Edmonton seems to have at least one beaver lodge built in it. The Whitemud Creek is different tough. While there are certainly beavers in the creek, there are no beaver dams or lodges, or at least I have not been able to find them. I always though that one reason for this would be that it is a creek where the water is in constant motion. That is until I found beaver dams and lodges in a remote location of the North Saskatchewan river. So much for that theory. After spending lots of time at the creek it has become evident that the quaint creek is a battle ground between industrious beavers and equally industrious humans. The beavers are trying to go about their lives, which obviously includes a domicile, food and raising a family, while the humans are doing everything they can to maintain the ravine as a safe recreational area. Much could be said about the back and forth battle between the beavers and humans (see for example yesterday’s post), but it is now becoming evident that the Whitemud Creek beavers do indeed build dams, and quite possible lodges as well, but the humans are removing them. The other day I came across a sizable dam entirely obstructing the creek that must have been erected over the last few weeks. It will be interesting to see how long it will take before the crews move in and remove it. I will be doing more regular visits to the creek to monitor the situation.

May the curiosity be with you. This is from “The Birds are Calling” blog (www.thebirdsarecalling.com). Copyright Mario Pineda.