Monthly Archives: August 2019

Project 366 – Post No. 141 – Coral Fungus

What is Project 366? Read more here!

So a mushroom walks into a party and the bouncer says, “Sorry we are full”. The mushroom replies: “But I don’t take up mushroom”.

Now that we have that out of the way,… this is without question the funkiest looking fungus I have come across so far. Initially I was even questioning if it was a fungus or something else altogether. But it turns out it is a fungus, a fungus that looks like no other fungus. The fruiting body seems to defy every notion of how a fungus should look. Where is the cap and the stalk? It turns out this one belongs to the clavarioid fungi group (after the genus Clavaria). These fungi are more commonly referred to as coral fungi. Despite the absence of the classical fairytale “mushroom look” it turns out that coral fungi do not only have a worldwide distribution but are one of the most common groups of fungi. With over 1200 species of coral fungi identifying the exact species is well beyond my ability, but apparently these fellas are edible.

Coral Fungus at Whitemud Creek. August 2, 2019. Nikon P1000, 24mm @ 35mm, 1/30s, f/2.8, ISO 140

May the curiosity be with you. This is from “The Birds are Calling” blog (www.thebirdsarecalling.com). Copyright Mario Pineda.

Project 366 – Post No. 140 – The eye of the Wood Bison

What is Project 366? Read more here!

After seeing plenty of Wood Bison at a distance dotting pastures, fields and forest edges I imagined that the day I would get close and personal with the largest terrestrial animal in the americas would be along a remote trail far away from human civilization. Well I could not me more mistaken. I came across this gigantic male Wood Bison right by the fence along Highway 16. I had stopped on a gravel road turn-out along the highway and there he was, a solitary male Wood Bison, right on the other side of the fence. I could have reached out and touched him if I wanted to. I decided not to give him any reason to tear down the fence and go after me. He was certainly curious though. As I approached the fence he came right up to meet me, not the least shy. Although the wire fence looked solid and was at least 6 feet tall it would not stand a chance against an adult Wood Bison hellbent on getting through. I did manage to get some nice closed up pictures of him, including this one where he is staring me down probably wondering what my intentions were.

The eye of the Wood Bison at Elk Island National Park. August 8, 2019. Nikon P1000, 325mm @ 35mm, 1/60s, f/4.5, ISO 400

May the curiosity be with you. This is from “The Birds are Calling” blog (www.thebirdsarecalling.com). Copyright Mario Pineda.

Project 366 – Post No. 139 – Prickly Wild Rose hips

What is Project 366? Read more here!

The flowers of the Prickly Wilde Roses are long gone and have been replaced by green hips. As they ripen they will turn orange and then red. The hips are edible, something the First Nations and Swedes have known since the dawn of time. I’ll be keeping my eyes on the rose hips to harvest some when they become ripe. Making rose hip tea might be the easiest way of reaping some of the health benefits of these fruits or, if I feel adventurous, I might just make a batch of rose hip soup. The wilting of the flowers and the ripening of fruits signals the impeding end of the summer. Technically September 23 is the last day of summer but typically things turn fall’ish much earlier in these neck of the woods.

Prickly Wild Rose hip at Whitemud Ravine. July 31, 2019. Nikon P1000, 24mm @ 35mm, 1/30s, f/2.8, ISO 100

May the curiosity be with you. This is from “The Birds are Calling” blog (www.thebirdsarecalling.com). Copyright Mario Pineda.

Project 366 – Post No. 138 – Shaggy Mane

What is Project 366? Read more here!

Most mushrooms I have encountered are difficult to identify to say the least. When I came across this fungi growing out of a rotting log on the moist forest floor I figure that something this distinct looking should be easier to identify. I did nevertheless take me quite some time to identify it, mainly because it took me a while to find an appropriate online reference for Alberta fungi. My best educated guess is that it is a Shaggy Mane, also known as Shaggy Ink Cap or Lawyer’s Wig (Coprinus comatus). In this fungi the young fruit bodies first appear as white cylinders emerging from the ground, reminiscent of The Gherkin. As the fruit bodies mature a bell-shaped cap opens out (you can see one in the far right foreground in the picture). It is edible, but I am not about to take any chances just in case I got the identification wrong. The species is carnivorous specializing in trapping, killing and digesting underground nematodes (microscopic underground roundworms) to obtain nutrients (so called nematophagy).

Shaggy Mane (Coprinus comatus) at Whitemud Ravine.July 31, 2019. Nikon P1000, 24mm @ 35mm, 1/30s, f/2.8, ISO 100

May the curiosity be with you. This is from “The Birds are Calling” blog (www.thebirdsarecalling.com). Copyright Mario Pineda.

Project 366 – Post No. 137 – Beaver in Cooking Lake-Blackfoot Provincial Recreational Area

What is Project 366? Read more here!

The Cooking-Lake-Blackfoot Provincial Recreational Are is a large nature reserve east of Edmonton. This reserve is characterized by rolling hills and a “knob and kettle” terrain, containing glacial moraines and depressions filled with small lakes. In one of those kettle lakes we came across a solitary American Beaver doing laps back and forth across the lake. Was it doing it’s daily exercise regime, was it patrolling its territory or was it just generally restless? Who knows what goes through the head of a lonely beaver on a sunny summer day. The Cooking Lake-Blackfoot Provincial Recreational Area is part of a much larger 1600 square kilometre area known as Beaver Hills and was designated an UNESCO Biosphere Reserve in 2016.

Solitary American Beaver (Castor canadensis) in lake at the Cooking Lake-Blackfoot Provincial Recreation Area. August 8, 2019. Nikon P1000, 118mm @ 35mm, 1/800s, f/4, ISO 100

May the curiosity be with you. This is from “The Birds are Calling” blog (www.thebirdsarecalling.com). Copyright Mario Pineda.

Project 366 – Post No. 136 – Wood frog in vernal pool

What is Project 366? Read more here!

This Wood Frog liked to live dangerously. It was basking at the surface of a shallow vernal pool of water in the middle of the trail as we came barraging along on our mountain bikes. The only reasons we managed to spot it was because we decided to get of our bikes and walk around the pool that nearly covered the entire width of the trail. Any other mountain biker would have seen this obstacle as a challenge one needs to tackle head on at full speed. The frog did not bat an eye as we spotted it and moved in closer to have a good look at it. Maybe it figured that if it just stays completely still we might not see it. Perhaps that is a viable strategy for the half a dozen garter snakes that we came across on the trail just a few hundered meters away, but it did not work with us…, then again, we were not considering it as our next meal.

Wood Frog (Lithobates sylvaticus) in vernal pool at the Cooking Lake-Blackfoot Provincial Recreation Area. August 8, 2019. Nikon P1000, 504mm @ 35mm, 1/320s, f/5, ISO 100

May the curiosity be with you. This is from “The Birds are Calling” blog (www.thebirdsarecalling.com). Copyright Mario Pineda.

Project 366 – Post No. 135 – Meadowhawk

What is Project 366? Read more here!

Dragonflies are a bit of an oxymoron. While everyone is able to instantly recognize a dragonfly, very few people know the names of the various dragonfly species, never mind being able to tell them apart and identify them. I am no different. We had just finished a trail ride in Cooking Lake-Blackfoot Provincial Recreation Area and had taken a break for a snack at the Waskahegan Staging Area when a couple a dragonflies landed on a sunny patch on the ground right next to us. My camera was out of reach and I did not want to spook the dragonflies so I decided to try to use my phone to take some pictures. I took a few pictures from some distance away and then I slowly moved to phone closer and closer thinking that they will for sure take off. But they stayed. I managed to get about a foot away from this one dragonfly (the phone was not able to focus at a closer distance) and managed to take this close up. At the time I had no idea what it was, other than a dragonfly. After a bit of research it appears that it most likely is a species of Meadowhawk, specifically a Cherry-Faced Meadowhawk (Sympetrum internum), but there are a few other species of Meadowhawk that look very similar. The name “Meadowhawk” is quite telling of the ecology of this species. It is found near marshy ponds, lakes, slow streams and on meadows. Like all dragonflies, the Meadowhawk is a predator. I can just picture it patrolling the meadow like a hawk for any soft-bodies flying insects such as mosquitoes, flies, moths and mayflies.

Meadowhawk at Waskahegan Staging Area at Cooking Lake-Blackfoot Provincial Recreation Area . August 8, 2019.

May the curiosity be with you. This is from “The Birds are Calling” blog (www.thebirdsarecalling.com). Copyright Mario Pineda.